How the UK Overcame the Ethical, Legal and Professional Challenges in Donation After Circulatory Death

  • Dale Gardiner Nottingham University

Abstract

Long transplant lists and a shortage of organ donors has led to an international resurgence in the donation of organs after circulatory death (‘DCD’). Despite being almost entirely absent for nearly 25 years, DCD now accounts for 40 per cent of deceased organ donation in the UK. This rise is in part due to attempts to resolve the ethical, legal and professional challenges inherent to this type of donation. Since 2008 in the UK, seven major ethical, legal and professional guidances have been published relating to deceased donation and DCD in particular. It is now this author’s opinion that the professional framework that underpins the DCD programme in the UK is the strongest in the world. This paper outlines the seven UK publications that justify this bold claim.

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Published
Mar 11, 2016
How to Cite
GARDINER, Dale. How the UK Overcame the Ethical, Legal and Professional Challenges in Donation After Circulatory Death. QUT Law Review, [S.l.], v. 16, n. 1, p. 125-134, mar. 2016. ISSN 2201-7275. Available at: <https://lr.law.qut.edu.au/article/view/632>. Date accessed: 21 apr. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.5204/qutlr.v16i1.632.

Keywords

organ donation, health law, organ transplatation
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